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The Department of Labor has announced the final rule that will increase the minimum salary for certain exempt white collar employees. The final rule is very close to the proposed rule we reported on in March.The new minimums will take effect January 1, 2020. Exempt Executive, Administrative, Professional, and Computer Employees (EAP) Salaried exempt EAP employees must be paid at least $684 per week on a salary basis (an increase from the current minimum of $455 per week). This is the…   read more...
An Overview of OSHA Oct 23, 2019
On December 29, 1970, Richard Nixon signed the Occupational Safety and Health Act into law, calling it “probably one of the most important pieces of legislation” ever passed by Congress. In a nutshell, the Act says workplaces must be “free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm.” These hazards were far from negligible. At the time, an estimated 14,000 workers were killed on the job every year. The Act created an administration agency…   read more...
401(k) Basics Oct 9, 2019
A retirement plan shows that you are invested in the futures of your employees and gives employees the opportunity to plan ahead and care for their financial futures. The 401(k) is a type of retirement account, aptly named after its section description in the IRS tax code (26 U.S. Code § 401(k)). This code section allows you to provide employees with an option to receive their earnings in cash or in a deferred compensation structure. Plan Options There are two main ways that employees can…   read more...
Employee turnover is expensive—more so than you might think. According to a recent survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, the average cost-per-hire is $4,129. However, turnover costs can vary depending on the length of time it takes to fill the role, the importance of the position to the employer, and the employer’s industry. Some costs are easily calculable, such as those of recruiting, hiring, and onboarding. Other costs can be difficult to measure, such as the impact of a…   read more...
Some California employers now have until January 1, 2021 to train employees on sexual harassment prevention—a one-year extension of the original January 1, 2020 deadline. The deadline was not extended for employers of seasonal and temporary employees, who are hired to work for less than six months. Starting January 1, 2020, these employees must be trained within 30 calendar days after their hire date or within 100 hours worked, whichever occurs first. Employer Training Deadlines Under the new…   read more...
Chances are most of your employees are on social media, and some of them may be using their private accounts to say things about their employment. Frustrated employees might even be complaining about their working conditions – or about you. While it may seem prudent to ban employees from saying anything negative about your organization online – or perhaps even discussing work at all – the National Labor Relations Board, which interprets the National Labor Relations Act, has ruled that this…   read more...
Employers have become well-attuned to the importance of selecting job candidates that are qualified and will fit well with the organization’s culture. Prior to extending an offer of employment to a viable candidate, best practices in conducting a background check are to use a variety of methods to assess skills, verify professional experience, and to check in with a candidate’s references. Some employers opt to use a third-party consumer reporting services to assist with reference checking…   read more...
The prospect of corrective action or termination makes a lot of managers nervous. That’s understandable. For employees, being disciplined or losing their job can be anything from moderately embarrassing to financially devastating, but it’s rarely a happy occasion. For the employers, these actions always come with some risk, and there are plenty of legal danger zones an employer can end up in if corrective action isn’t done properly. Here are some tips from our HR Pros to help you avoid these…   read more...
HR covers a lot of territory—much of it cluttered with paperwork—but it really does have a precise business purpose. The point of HR is to make employment more profitable. HR does this in three fundamental ways. First, HR protects the organization against employment-related lawsuits and fines. Second, it reduces the costs of employment. And third, it maximizes employee productivity. In short, HR helps the employer save money and make money in all things related to employment. Protection from…   read more...
In the previous articles of the series on workplace culture, we showed you how to identify and evaluate your culture by examining the rules that govern behavior, the traditions that facilitate interactions, and people you employ. We turn now to the final topic in this series: how to improve your culture. There’s no easy formula to fixing all cultural problems because each workplace is unique. The rules and traditions that lead one team to success might bring a different team to ruin. Some…   read more...
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